Wednesday, July 18, 2018

A Few Things I Learned at Practicum

Last week at Practicum, I received my training to tutor the Essentials class in the afternoon sessions.  There was great information shared there.  But in the morning sessions, we had a wonderful speaker Sandy James who imparted much wisdom.  She told many stories about her own children and other children whom she knows, and it was encouraging to hear that we haven't failed as parents if our children drift when they leave our houses.  My favorite analogy was that children are like baking a cake:  if you check them in the middle before they're "done," they are raw and gooey on the inside.  You have to wait to assess them after they are completely "baked."

Here are a few quotes I wrote down that spoke to me; I thought you might appreciate them as well:
  1. Isaiah 54:13.  "All your children shall be taught by the Lord, and great shall be the peace of your children."  Our speaker repeatedly brought us back to this verse, emphasizing how God will meet us and our children as we sit at the kitchen table doing school.  She also told us that the Hebrew word for "peace" is "shalom" which means nothing broken, nothing missing.  We can trust God that, when we teach our children, at the end of it all, there will be nothing missing, nothing broken; their education will be complete.  
  2. Discipline is an automatic reaction to vision.  If you have a vision for where you want to end up with your children as you homeschool, you will be disciplined to get there.  For example, when I'm training for a race, I don't mind as much getting up in the morning and running hard.  I have a vision.  When I'm just running for exercise, it's so much harder.  
  3. If you begin with the end in mind, the middle won't trip you up.  Again, if you have a clear vision of your goal, you won't get sidetracked when things get difficult before you get there.
  4. I have nothing better to do with my time than disciple my children.  This quote was my favorite, and the one I most needed to hear because I tend to forget it.  Speaking with them, discipling them, listening to them is so much more important than the book or blog I'm reading or the task I'm trying to complete.
  5. People (my children) need me when they need me, not when I am ready to be needed.  Isn't that the truth?  It seems that my children only need me when I'm busy doing something relatively important.  It's inconvenient; they're inconvenient.  But that's the way God designed things and how He can use our children to make us more like His Son.
Do any of these quotes speak to you?  Have you heard anything interesting lately?

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